Does Naturalism Hurt Science? Another Voice Speaks Out

Recently a friend of mine shared an article with me from the Huffington Post. Now I’m not a big fam of the Huff Post. Philosophically they have a staff of writers and a readership that tends to be very anti-religion, anti-bible, and committed to naturalistic humanism. But when I read the article I was presently surprised at what I found. Here a scientist (and as far as  I know a non-Christian) dares to point out the inconsistency with science as a learning tool and “science” as naturalism. Here’s a small sample:

Science has been successful because it has been open to new discoveries. By contrast, committed materialists have made science into a kind of religion. They believe that there is no reality but material or physical reality. Consciousness is a by-product of the physical activity of the brain. Matter is unconscious. Nature is mechanical. Evolution is purposeless. God exists only as an idea in human minds, and hence in human heads.
These materialist beliefs are often taken for granted by scientists, not because they have thought about them critically, but because they haven’t. To deviate from them is heresy, and heresy harms careers.

You can find the rest of the article here; it’s well worth a read. I truly hope that someday we will be able to separate science as a tool from naturalism as a philosophy. Both science and philosophy will be better for it.

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About Mark Hamilton

I am, in no particular order, a nerd, an aspiring writer, a Christian, an aspiring filmmaker, an avid reader, a male, a YEC, a GM, and a twenty something. I like learning how things are made, finding out how to do things from scratch, and I you can find more of my writing at thepagenebula.wordpress.com

Posted on January 28, 2013, in Apologetics, Christianity, Link, Science!. Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. “not because they have thought about them critically, but because they haven’t. ”

    Says this writer. And while I may not be a scientist, I can say I have thought about those things critically. And don’t see much wrong with them at all.

    Nor has the writer of this article said why they are wrong. Just that they are. Which is a claim, but if he has no evidence to back it up, why should I believe it?

  2. First off, thanks a lot for commenting! Too many people keep their thoughts to themselves, and it’s hard to get a good discussion going if nobody bothers to talk!

    To be fair to the author I only quoted a small part of his article here. In the larger article he points out a few areas where scientific advances haven’t lined up with materialistic philosophy; on the other hand he doesn’t give too many details or make any specific arguments against materialism. I believe that his main point is not that materialism is wrong, but instead to remind us that science is not bound to a particular philosophy. Too ofter “materialism” and “science” is conflated to mean the same thing. Materialism is a philosophy that is ultimately unprovable (or disprovable) by science. For example materialism holds that there is nothing outside of (or above) nature. This is a statement that cannot be tested; you can’t scientifically prove the nonexistance of something. This isn’t to say that materialism is wrong: just that it is a philosophy that we take with us when we come to science, not a fact that we discovered through the use of the scientific method.

    Anyway, the larger point is that too many people today treat materialism as a belief that you must hold in order to be a scientist, and this view is holding science back. I think we can all agree that any philosophy or belief is dangerous to science if those who hold it refuse to consider explanations that don’t fit within it.

  3. Reblogged this on paarsurrey and commented:
    Paarsurrey says:
    I agree with you.

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